Yekaterinburg, Russia This church was built over the Ipatiev House where Nicholas II and his family were held when they were executed by the Bolsheviks in the basement below. The basement remains intact, where the church is a somewhat opulent construction overhead. A stark contrast to the somber, penitent monastery I visited earlier in the day. As an interesting side note, the sculpture has two major historical inaccuracies: First, Nicholas II’s son, Alexei, is far too small to accurately represent his teenage self at the time of his death. Second, some of the statues can be seen displaying crosses outside of their clothing. This was something reserved for the clergy at the time, and wouldn’t have been done by even members of the monarchy in Russia.

Yekaterinburg, Russia

This church was built over the Ipatiev House where Nicholas II and his family were held when they were executed by the Bolsheviks in the basement below. The basement remains intact, where the church is a somewhat opulent construction overhead. A stark contrast to the somber, penitent monastery I visited earlier in the day.

As an interesting side note, the sculpture has two major historical inaccuracies:

First, Nicholas II’s son, Alexei, is far too small to accurately represent his teenage self at the time of his death.

Second, some of the statues can be seen displaying crosses outside of their clothing. This was something reserved for the clergy at the time, and wouldn’t have been done by even members of the monarchy in Russia.